$2.5 million settlement because draft policies and plans were neither finalized nor implemented before laptop theft

recent HHS settlement that included a relatively small monetary penalty, $31,000, didn’t seem to get a lot of media attention. Maybe today’s announced settlement stemming from a laptop theft that resulted in a steep monetary penalty will get attention? From HHS:

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office for Civil Rights (OCR), has announced a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) settlement based on the impermissible disclosure of unsecured electronic protected health information (ePHI). CardioNet has agreed to settle potential noncompliance with the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules by paying $2.5 million and implementing a corrective action plan. This settlement is the first involving a wireless health services provider, as CardioNet provides remote mobile monitoring of and rapid response to patients at risk for cardiac arrhythmias.

In January 2012, CardioNet reported to the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) that a workforce member’s laptop was stolen from a parked vehicle outside of the employee’s home. The laptop contained the ePHI of 1,391 individuals. OCR’s investigation into the impermissible disclosure revealed that CardioNet had an insufficient risk analysis and risk management processes in place at the time of the theft. Additionally, CardioNet’s policies and procedures implementing the standards of the HIPAA Security Rule were in draft form and had not been implemented. Further, the Pennsylvania –based organization was unable to produce any final policies or procedures regarding the implementation of safeguards for ePHI, including those for mobile devices.

“Mobile devices in the health care sector remain particularly vulnerable to theft and loss,” said Roger Severino, OCR Director. “Failure to implement mobile device security by Covered Entities and Business Associates puts individuals’ sensitive health information at risk. This disregard for security can result in a serious breach, which affects each individual whose information is left unprotected.”

The Resolution Agreement and Corrective Action Plan may be found on the OCR website at https://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/compliance-enforcement/agreements/cardionet

SOURCE: HHS

More than five years from report of the theft to HHS settlement? It would be great if HHS had the resources to investigate and pursue more cases in a way that resolves them more quickly.

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