Subcontractor

And so it begins… state attorneys general investigating American Medical Collection Agency breach

From the Illinois Attorney General’s Office: Chicago — Attorney General Kwame Raoul and Connecticut Attorney General William Tong today announced an investigation into the data breach at American Medical Collection Agency, which may have exposed the personal information of nearly 12 million patients of Quest Diagnostics (Quest) and 7.7 million Laboratory Corporation of America (LabCorp) patients....

Aetna first notifying 238 Virginia employees of BenefitMall breach that they’ve known about since December, 2018?

In January, 2019, we learned about a breach at Centerstone Insurance and Financial Services, Inc. d/b/a BenefitMall, a business associate.  The breach reportedly affected more than 111,000 insurance members/covered employees of the vendor’s clients. HIPAA Journal covered the incident. Yesterday, Aetna issued a public notice  related to the incident. Surprisingly, their notice discloses that...

Unsurprisingly, big numbers from the AMCA breach are starting to be revealed

On May 10, when DataBreaches.net first reported that the American Medical Collection Agency had been breached, we reported that information from 200,000 payment cards had been found for sale on a top-tier market by Gemini Advisory analysts, whose investigation linked those cards to AMCA.  At the time, we did not know how many other...

Tennessee, 15 Other States Reach $900,000 Data Breach Settlement With Medical Informatics Engineering

Attorney General Herbert H. Slatery III announced Wednesday that a U.S. District Court judge has signed a consent judgment negotiated by 16 states’ attorneys general and Medical Informatics Engineering, Inc. This case was the nation’s first-ever multistate lawsuit involving a HIPAA-related data breach. The lawsuit, led by Indiana, was filed in December of 2018...

Utah knew the company it picked to create standardized tests had a history of crashes and cyberattacks. It signed a $44 million contract with Questar anyway.

Courtney Tanner reports: In other states, the year-end tests were marked by glitches and cyberattacks and hourlong delays. One school district threw out its results because the software was so unreliable. In another, all of the students had to start over when the programming shut down and didn’t save their responses. Sensitive student data...