Unauthorized Access

IN: Employee defection sparks battle between brokerages

Chris O’Malley reports: A legal battle has broken out between two insurance brokerages, with Hylant Group alleging Huntington Insurance hired one its former employees who then lured away two of its clients. Toledo,Ohio-based Hylant, which has offices in Carmel, alleges former employee Nicholas Iaonnacci, of Indianapolis, violated a two-year non-compete clause of his employment...

Federal court ruling in Carnegie Strategic Design Engineers v. Cloherty applies narrow interpretation of CFAA

Robert R. Baron, Jr., David S. Fryman, Corinne Militello, and Philip N. Yannella of Ballard Spahr write: A Pennsylvania federal magistrate judge has tossed an employer’s claims under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA), holding that the CFAA does not extend to punish employees for the misuse of information that was accessed with...

Prosecutors Admit They Don’t Understand What Weev Did, But They’re Sure It’s Like Blowing Up A Nuclear Plant

Perhaps one of the stupidest things a prosecutor trying to defend criminal prosecution under CFAA can say is to admit that they have no understanding of what the alleged “hacker” did that made his conduct a hack or violation of CFAA. But that’s pretty much what happened in a Philadelphia courtroom yesterday during Weev’s...

Courts Reining In What it Means to be a “Hacker” Under the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA)

Ralph C. Losey of Jackson Lewis writes: The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) is an anti-hacker statute that prohibits unauthorized access, or the exceeding of authorized access, of computers connected to interstate commerce. 18 U.S.C. § 1030. Violators are subject to both criminal and civil liability. Employers have long taken advantage of the CFAA’s civil remedies to “sue former...